Woman getting scanned with healthcare workers looking at value of health data.
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Developing a Value Framework for Medical Imaging Data

April 13, 2021

Our CEO Claire Bloomfield shares three headline findings from FCC’s latest report exploring the value of data, commissioned by NCIMI to help partners navigate through the complexity.

  • Multi-stakeholder data deals are uncharted water – we need to embrace the complexity
  • Perspective matters – we need to change the focus points in the ‘data value chain’ to tackle later stages of value creation
  • A holistic whole system approach will optimise value realisation – balancing needs and priorities across stakeholders

Multi-stakeholder data deals are uncharted water- we need to embrace the complexity

By nature of the projects we undertake at NCIMI, we work with diverse sets of medical imaging data, often from multiple sources.

Currently, the legal framework governing UK healthcare offers little guidance on how we pull together multi-stakeholder agreements – across varied NHS partners, with different data controllers and the added complexity this brings compared to binary one-trust-to-one-company deals.

Developing more support for these multi-stakeholder structures is critical for AI-based projects – we need to work together to find practical and sensible ways to approach the sharing or redistribution of any value working with data might create. 

Perspective matters – we need to change the focus points in the ‘data value chain’ to tackle later stages of value creation

The advice and guidance available to NHS organisations looking to enter into data collaborations with third parties remains limited from the point of view of ‘value creation’. 

As the report highlights and from our own experience in NCIMI, this is because policymakers and healthcare professionals tend to emphasise the importance of compliance with data protection provisions and ‘information governance’, rather than focus on the implementing frameworks and guidance.

At NCIMI, our focus is on the full length ‘data value chain’ and how it positively impacts creation and deployment of new treatments and technologies. 

Whilst there are legal obligations and regulatory guidance which emphasises the need to strike a ‘fair deal’, there is a significant gap in recommendations which outline how this can be achieved in practice. 

We believe the legal and regulatory gap may leaves NHS data controllers exposed: they are required to protect the financial value of the personal data they hold, and the commercial opportunities created by medical research, without proper explanation of how that value is to be calculated. We want to work with our NCIMI partners to support deep, rich conversations and negotiation over generating optimal value.

A holistic whole system approach will optimise value realisation – balancing needs and priorities across stakeholders

A holistic value framework applied to healthcare data should encompass clinical, social, economic development, environmental and commercial value. As explored in my presentation to the BIR, we could consider these as value ‘lever’s which must be ‘balanced’ to strike the ‘right kind of deals involving the data, and the specific partners involved.

The extent to which one or another is prioritised or balance across these in any given data deal will be coloured by the healthcare challenge identified; the population it affects; the maturity and interest of research and corporate entities capable of and/or interested in responding to the challenge; and the scope for any response to generate a commercial return.

Part of our focus with NCIMI is ensuring we work with NHS and healthcare partners across the UK and globally, developing and deploying data-driven AI, which ensures healthcare professionals and patients can benefit from AI advances whatever their postcode, and thereby supporting the Government’s levelling up agenda.

To read the full report, head to Future Care Capital’s website.

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